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LONGUS COLLI

Longus Colli muscle

Origin of Longus Colli

C3 to T3. Anterior tubercles and anterior surfaces of bodies of C3 to T3. Superior Oblique portion arises from anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, and fifth cervical vertebræ. Inferior Oblique portion arises from the front of the bodies of the first two or three thoracic vertebræ. Vertical portion arises from the front of the bodies of the upper three thoracic and lower three cervical vertebræ.

Insertion of Longus Colli

Anterior arch of atlas, anterior tubercles of C5-6, anterior surfaces of bodies of vertebrae C2-4. Superior Oblique portion inserts into the tubercle on the anterior arch of the atlas. Inferior Oblique portion into the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the fifth and sixth cervical vertebræ. Verticle portion into the front of the bodies of the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebræ.

Muscle Action/Function of Longus Colli

Cervical flexion, ipsilateral side flexion, some cervical rotation. As well as acting with the other cervical flexors to produce neck flexion, Longus Colli has been shown to have a postural function on cervical curvature, counteracting the lordosis increment related to the weight of the head and to the contraction of the posterior cervical muscles. It is commonly implicated in whiplash. Impaired strength and endurance of the deep neck flexors has been found to be a feature of cervicogenic headache.

Arterial (Blood) Supply of Longus Colli

The muscle receives blood from the ascending cervical artery, which is a small branch of the inferior thyroid artery from the thyrocervical trunk of the subclavian artery. It also receives blood from the ascending pharyngeal artery.
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Longus Colli Video

Prevertebral Muscles

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